HAPPY 4TH OF JULY

Happy 4th of July from ALL the Firefighters of the Washington Township Fire Department. BE SAFE!

   


 

State Law Prohibits Every Firework Type Except Caps

 State Law Prohibits Every Firework Type Except Caps 

The Washington Township Fire District would like to pass along an informative message from the New Jersey Department of Labor & Workforce Development, Office of Safety Compliance: 

Once again, we are entering the fireworks season and we would like to acquaint you with New Jersey's Fireworks Laws. 

New Jersey's laws on fireworks, N.J.S.A. 21:2-1 et seq. and N.J.S.A. 21:3-1 et seq., are very restrictive. In some states, fireworks are permitted to be sold to, and used by, the public. However, in New Jersey, only paper or plastic caps for use in toy guns are legal. 

Sparkler and novelty items, such as cigarette loads, trick matches, trick noise makers, smoke grenades, toy propellants, snaps & pops, poppetts and champagne poppers, as well as firecrackers, roman candles, rockets, etc., are all illegal in this state. Do not be fooled by a salesperson who tries to tell you that they are authorized to be sold by the Consumer Products Safety Commission, or are sold by mail order houses, or are permitted to be sold in other states, or are permitted to be shipped by the U.S. Department of Transportation. 

To repeat - the only fireworks that can legally be sold and used in New Jersey are paper and plastic caps for toy cap guns

The Fireworks Laws are jointly enforced by municipalities and the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. The law states that the sale or possession of fireworks, with intent to sell, is a crime of the fourth degree. Any person found guilty of possessing fireworks, including sparklers, with the intention of selling them, can be fined up to $7,500 and/or imprisoned up to 18 months. Any person found using fireworks illegally can be fined up to $500 and/or imprisoned for up to 30 days. 

   


 

4 Firefighters Graduate Fire 1

Thursday, June 18, 2015  Wednesday June 17th 4 Washington Twp Firefighters Graduated the Fire 1 program @ Camden County Fire Academy. Nick Ditullio Station 10-2, Nick Esposito, Joe Brown and Nicole Domingo Station 10-3 Nicole Domingo received the James Sylvester Award.

     
L to R Capt Garagoso Nick Ditullio Battalion Chief Reisenwitz District Deputy Chief Weitzman

L to R Capt Garagoso Nick Ditullio
      Battalion Chief Reisenwitz District
      Deputy Chief Weitzman

L to R District Deputy Chief Weitzman Nicole Domingo Nick Esposito Joe Brown

L to R District Deputy Chief Weitzman
      Nicole Domingo Nick Esposito Joe Brown



 

Firefighters Graduate Fire 1

Thursday, June 18, 2015  Monday June 15th Firefighters Josh Lee and Alex Astore Graduated from the Fire 1 program @ GCIT. Congratulations Josh and Alex job well done.

   


 

HEAT STROKE AND HEAT EXHAUSTION

  Heat Exhaustion and Heatstroke
What causes heat exhaustion and heatstroke?

Heat-related illnesses, such as heat exhaustion and heatstroke, occur when your body can't keep itself cool. As the air temperature rises, your body stays cool when your sweat evaporates. On hot, humid days, the evaporation of sweat is slowed by the increased moisture in the air. When sweating isn't enough to cool your body, your body temperature rises, and you may become ill.


What is heat exhaustion?

Heat exhaustion happens when your body gets too hot. It can be caused by physical exercise or hot weather. You may experience:



  • Heavy sweating
  • Feeling weak and/or confused
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Dark-colored urine, which indicates dehydration
What should I do if I think I have heat exhaustion?

If you think you have heat exhaustion, get out of the heat quickly. Rest in a building that has air-conditioning. If you can't get inside, find a cool, shady place. Drink plenty of water or other fluids. Do NOT drink alcohol or caffeinated drinks (such as soda). These can make heat exhaustion worse. Take a cool shower or bath, or apply cool water to your skin. Take off any tight or unnecessary clothing.

If you do not feel better within 30 minutes, you should contact your doctor. If heat exhaustion is not treated, it can progress to heatstroke.

What is heatstroke?

Symptoms of heatstroke


  • High fever (104°F or higher)
  • Severe headache
  • Dizziness and feeling light-headed
  • A flushed or red appearance to the skin
  • Lack of sweating
  • Muscle weakness or cramps
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Fast breathing
  • Feeling confused, anxious or disoriented
  • Seizures
Heatstroke is when the internal temperature of the body reaches 104°F. It can happen when your body gets too hot during strenuous exercise or when exposed to very hot temperatures, or it can happen after heat exhaustion isn't properly treated. Heatstroke is much more serious than heat exhaustion. Heatstroke can cause damage to your organs and brain. In extreme cases, it can kill you. 

What should I do if I think someone has heatstroke?

If you think someone might have heatstroke, call emergency medical personnel immediately. While you are waiting for medical assistance, take the person into an air-conditioned building or a cool, shady place. Remove the person's unnecessary clothing to help cool him or her down. Try to fan air over the person while wetting the skin with water. You can also apply ice packs to the person's armpits, groin, neck and back. These areas contain a lot of blood vessels close the surface of the skin. Cooling them with ice packs can help the person cool down.

 

Get medical help right away if you have these warning signs:


  • Skin that feels hot and dry, but not sweaty
  • Confusion or loss of consciousness
  • Frequent vomiting
  • Shortness of breath or trouble breathing
Do medicines affect heatstroke?

The following are some medicines that can put you in danger of heatstroke because they affect the way your body reacts to heat:

  • Allergy medicines (antihistamines)
  • Some blood pressure and heart medicines (beta-blockers and vasoconstrictors) 
  • Diet pills and illegal drugs such as cocaine (amphetamines)
  • Laxatives
  • Some medicines that treat mental health conditions (antidepressants and antipsychotics)
  • Seizure medicines (anticonvulsants)
  • Water pills (diuretics) 
Tell your doctor what medicines you are taking. He or she can tell you if your medicine puts you in danger of heatstroke.

What does the "heat index" mean?

The heat index tells you how hot it feels outside in the shade. It is not the same as the outside temperature. The heat index is a measurement of how hot it feels when relative humidity is combined with the effects of the air temperature. When you are standing in full sunshine, the heat index value is even higher. A heat index of 90°F or higher is dangerous.

How can I prevent heat illness?

When the heat index is high, stay indoors in air-conditioned areas when possible. If you must go outside, take the following precautions:

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